If you are a teacher, the prospect of being falsely accused of sexually abusing a child has probably crossed your mind. If it hasn’t, it should.

While most teachers never have this problem, you’ve probably heard of someone who has. It is far easier to reduce the risk than to have to deal with false allegations. Here are five steps you can take to protect yourself:

  1. Avoid being alone with a child: This can be hard to avoid at times, but it is harder for someone to make an accusation when there are other people around.
  2. Ask your school to install video cameras: Many people dislike video surveillance: It can seem like big brother is watching. Yet video evidence can rule out some false claims.
  3. Leave doors open, and windows unshuttered: People can be suspicious about what goes on behind closed doors. If the doors are wide open, and people can walk past and see into the windows, you are making it clear you have nothing to hide.
  4. Work together with other teachers: Helping each other out is critical. If you are worried about a meeting with a child, ask one of your colleagues to come along.
  5. Report everything: Having a record of things provides evidence if a child falsely accuses you. For instance, if a child seems overly friendly, or a girl leaves her blouse buttons undone in your class, report it to your supervisors and make sure they record it.

Taking these steps can help protect you from false allegations of child abuse when you are working as a teacher. However, they could still occur. If they do, seek legal counsel from an understanding attorney with experience defending teachers from false allegations of child abuse in Michigan.