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KIRSCH DASKAS IS A BOUTIQUE LAW FIRM

Uniquely Representing Adults And Juveniles Accused Of Sex Crimes And Child Abuse.

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Can social media hurt your criminal case?

On Behalf of Kirsch Daskas Law Group | Mar 9, 2022 | Criminal Defense 

At one point, social media was a novel idea that was just taking off. Social media is now a routine form of communication, with billions of people using it across the globe.

The problem with social media is that anyone with adequate knowledge can access it, even if your privacy settings have been adjusted. If you are facing criminal charges, can social media have an impact on your case? The short answer is yes. There are numerous ways that social media could potentially impact your case, as outlined below.

Pictures tell a story

Generally, pictures that have been shared in public posts can be admitted as evidence in court. To you, a picture that you shared on a night out with friends could be completely harmless. To others, especially the prosecution, it may be utilized to create an incriminating narrative. For instance, you may have shared or been tagged in a photo on the night you were accused of a DUI offense. If you are shown drinking in a club, this could jeopardize your case.

Establishing your whereabouts

Many people utilize social media check-ins to show where they are, who they are with and what they are up to. For instance, you may have checked in to your local gym before a workout. This is completely harmless, taken on its own. However, if your check-in coincides with the location where you have been accused of criminal activity, it could bolster the arguments of the prosecution.

You don’t have to stop using social media completely while facing charges, but you should consider carefully the impact of your posts. It is also important to avoid the temptation of deleting accounts, as this could be used to indicate guilt. When facing criminal charges, it is vital to have good advice and gain a firm understanding of your legal rights.